Sarson’s history began in 1794 when they first started making vinegar in Craven Street, London. Today, they make six million litres of Sarson’s vinegar every year – that’s 15 million bottles! Brewed from British malt, using Woodwool from larch timber grown by the Leighton Estate in Wales and craft brewed in Siberian pine vats. The process takes seven days to create a rich and round taste and it has been done in the same way for over 200 years using quality British ingredients.

For more information, visit www.sarsons.co.uk.

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Whether you are a large company looking to be more eco-friendly or a small producer wanting to bring a rustic feel to your product, we have the solution for you.

Great British Woodwool offer four grades of woodwool suitable for a wide range of uses and can provide a sustainable alternative to plastic packaging.

From sourcing timber to the point of distribution, all processes are carried out in house. This allows us full control and ensures you receive the highest quality woodwool available.

We pride ourselves on our customer care and continually work to develop our products, services and solutions to best suit the individual needs of our customer.

Our Woodwool

Our woodwool is currently available in 10kg and 20kg bales in four different grades. If you have any specific requirements please contact us and we will be more than happy to try and accommodate your needs.

Click here to view our products.

Natural

From a standing tree to our woodwool bale, absolutely nothing is added, it really is just wood. Our product is 100% natural and perfect for any application from packing fruit to stuffing a teddy bear.

Sustainable

All of our woodwool is manufactured using timber from well managed British woodlands which are committed to replanting for the future. The majority of our timber is sourced within a 30 mile radius of our production facility which minimises our carbon footprint and reduces our impact on the environment.

Compostable

Our woodwool is a high quality, natural product and is capable of retaining its properties for many intended uses. At the end of its life, in the right conditions, it is biodegradable and will breakdown naturally in your compost bin.

About Us

Great British Woodwool Ltd was founded in September 2018 when we recognised the potential to develop a new business from the foundations of a discontinued local manufacturing facility. Based in the heart of Mid Wales we have an abundance of local, well-managed woodlands from which to source our timber.

The Managing Director, Craig Pugh, has many years experience in the timber industry having run a successful arboricultural business giving him a good understanding of the raw material and its properties.

Since starting the business, we have spent time to understand the product and processes and are investing in new equipment enabling us to continually develop and improve the production and quality of our woodwool.

With the world focusing on climate change and its impact on the environment, as a natural product, we believe our woodwool offers a sustainable alternative to plastic packaging alongside its many other uses.

Case Studies

Sarson’s history began in 1794 when they first started making vinegar in Craven Street, London. Today, they make six million litres of Sarson’s vinegar every year – that’s 15 million bottles! Brewed from British malt, using our Woodwool from larch timber grown by the Leighton Estate in Wales and craft brewed in Siberian pine vats. The process takes seven days to create a rich and round taste and it has been done in the same way for over 200 years using quality British ingredients.

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